What, really, is the point of power?

A wonderful university where I worked 15 years ago tried to instill the idea of Leader-Servant, that leaders serve those they lead, and no one makes a truly good leader who hasn’t been first a humble servant.

But we have it all backwards. There’s a battle in America now for who gets to be in charge and have the most servants (meaning, us). But America’s leaders are supposed to serve us; that detail has been ignored for some time now. (An interesting side note–historically, no republic has even lasted more than 200 years without a revolution; we’re now at 244 years. We’re overdue.)

Ppoint of power

(I personally hate having power or being in charge; it’s too much responsibility and I don’t want to disappoint anyone. Being #2 is far better–I’m a good helper, not a good leader. Ask anyone who’s had me in charge of something.)

What do you do with the truth when it confronts you?

It’s fascinating to watch people suddenly clam up when they’re hit with the truth. What they do next is very telling. They’ll either dance in a frantic way to jig around what was said, or they’ll outright deny it with avoidance or accusations, or they’ll ponder in silence then thoughtfully say, “You may be on to something . . .”

I know I’ve done all three when hit with a truth I wasn’t expecting. Surprise makes us stumble. But I’ve always felt the most at peace when I consider that maybe I was wrong, and that maybe the other person is on to something.

pstop talking truth

Remember to get the newly-released short story, excerpted from Book 7: “Teeria Rigoff; Age, over 50.”

There’s even an audio component, too, if you want to listen to my dulcet tones put you to sleep for 40 minutes. Apparently my 10th graders love it when I read to them. They say it’s the best nap they get all day in school.

Short story pdf: CLICK HERE Teeria Rigoff–age, over 50

Audio book: CLICK HERE

Teeria Rigoff short story cover

Is it the truth, or a poor assumption we’re desperate to cling to?

I’ve discovered that learning a “new truth,” which means that my “old truth” was actually a “poorly constructed assumption,” can be very unsettling.

However, when I ponder the “new truth” and realize the wisdom and growth that comes from it, I’m able to let go of the “poor assumptions” which I was so enamored with, and move on to a far more “stable, honest reality.”

Granted, judging what’s “assumption” and what’s “truth” is a struggle, but it’s the ultimate struggle of life. It’s the whole reason we’re here: will we accept the truth when we discover it?

Pnot ready for the truth

Get the prequel The Walls in the Middle of Idumea here!

At least TRY to do the right thing–anything!

I had an acquaintance who was paralyzed by her own doubts. When she felt the prompting to do something for someone, she’d second guess and third guess until it was too late.

For example, once she felt a new mom in her neighborhood was overwhelmed, and she decided to bring her over a package of newborn diapers and some treats. But at the store she was torn with indecision about what brand of diapers to buy: the no-name brand, like she used for her own kids but might make her look “cheap,” or the fancier brand, which she  feared the new mother might think she was being a show-off.

She eventually bought both brands, then fretted about delivering them. She put it off and put it off until the baby was no longer the newborn and was wearing size 3 diapers.

This woman later said, “I was too focused about doing the right thing in the ‘wrong’ way, then I was too focused about how I’d come off, rather than focusing on the person who was in need. In the end, I never gave her any diapers, which I heard later she really could have used since she’d had to quit work for two months after having the baby, and her income was nearly nothing. She wouldn’t have cared about the brand, just about being loved.”

Below is my all-time favorite Christmas song and video about just doing something, the best way you can:

Just try to do something!

p try to do the right thing

Demand the freedom to live a fulfilling life

I missed posting yesterday, and I could use the excuse that I was merely exercising my freedom not to. But the truth is that teaching school (door decorating contests get pretty intense around here) and being in charge of a church dinner (we made the ham, funeral potatoes–best dish in the world–salads, centerpieces and dessert) packed my day and evening.

Am I forced to live a busy life? Good gravy, no.
I choose it.
I love it.

I love teaching, although the month of December is incredibly distracting to students.
I love serving the tiny branch of my church.
I love choosing my life, doing what I think and believe is the best.

Fight to have the freedom to choose your own life, and the bravery to demand that freedom.

pfreedom to choose

Get the prequel The Walls in the Middle of Idumea here!

My philosophy for teaching–don’t think about it too much

This sums up my approach to teaching, especially my first year.

Now that I’m in my third year . . . no, this still rings true.

(I do think about it, really, but it’s impossible to judge just how a lesson plan is going to go. Every single day . . . impossible.)

pgoing just fine

Get the prequel The Walls in the Middle of Idumea here!