My philosophy for teaching–don’t think about it too much

This sums up my approach to teaching, especially my first year.

Now that I’m in my third year . . . no, this still rings true.

(I do think about it, really, but it’s impossible to judge just how a lesson plan is going to go. Every single day . . . impossible.)

pgoing just fine

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Boys and injuries–like chocolate and peanut butter, they just go together

I’m a mother of five boys. Injuries just happen, especially if there are several boys. Before they’re reached their teenage years, each of my sons has been clanked and clonked and dropped and slammed multiple times. Even my quietest, most sensible son has had stitches for splitting open his thigh by merely tripping over a wheelbarrow. (I saw it happen, otherwise I never would have believed it.)

It’s remarkable how much damage can occur to/by boys simply by running to the kitchen when dinner is ready. My youngest son is now eight, and even though he’s fairly mellow, there will be injuries before he’s an adult. I keep my insurance card handy at all times.

Pboys and head injuries

Pbrain damage boys

The Walls in the Middle of Idumea will be a FREE DOWNLOAD this weekend. I’ll let you know which days!

Some people are just hard to figure out

I really enjoyed Pere Shin, and I hope he tells me more stories so I can write another book about him. He feels like a friend I’d forgotten about and recently found again.

In many ways, this description of Pere reminds me of my job. Sometimes after a class I feel a little like this. (I’m an introvert at heart; teaching–which I love–is also exhausting!)

And, to be fair, I think a few of my students think this about me as well:

Pshin confused him

The Walls in the Middle of Idumea will be a FREE DOWNLOAD this weekend. I’ll let you know which days!